Umojafest 2018 – August 3 – August 5 / AfricaTown Heritage Parade

Attractions include the AfricanTown Heritage Parade featuring dance troops and drill teams, Children’s Day & Familly Fun Village, Soul N The Park, Afrobeats & Roots Stage, Heal the Hood Basketball Tournament & Hip Hop 4 Peace stage and delicious flavors of the African diaspora from restaurants, food trucks, vendor marketplace and community resource fair and more!

Visit the UMOJAFEST Website!

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Africatown Celebrating our History…Planning Our Future

Africatown Celebrating our History…Planning Our Future

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend

It was a great day in the Central District this past Sunday, July 8th. An estimated 300+ people came out for the Paint The Block Party creating a 30,000+ sq. ft. mural in honor of Black community that has called the Central District home for over 130 years and marking our place in the future of the Central District and Seattle. The paint party is helping to bring to life an interim activation that captures the essence of what community wants to see in the redeveloped 23rd & Union including space for Black community, culture, commerce.


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The project is being led by Africatown Central District Preservation & Development Association and Studio Zewde in collaboration with Urban Artworks and made possible by Africatown Community Land Trust, Lake Union Partners and Capitol Hill Housing with support from Historic Central Area Arts & Cultural District, Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development, Weinstein AU, WG Clark Construction and Walsh Construction.

Also last week Africatown Community Land Trust was awarded an equitable development grant of $1,000,000 to help fund Africatown Plaza building to be developed with Capitol Hill Housing on the Midtown Center site and $75,000 for organization capacity. The overall development costs for the project are estimated at $42,000,000.

Now, this weekend join us to plan for the future of the Central District that makes the essence of the activation permanent at 23rd and Union and throughout the CD!

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend brings international architects to Seattle to imagine the future of Central District and Black neighborhoods

This weekend July 13-14 Africatown welcomes renowned designer Walter Hood, founder of Hood Design Studio and Pan African architect Nmadili Okumabua, founder Community Design & Planning Initiative Africa to Seattle to headline our first ever Imagine Africatown Central District Design Weekend, July 13-14 at the legendary Garfield High School.

On Friday the Design Town Hall will feature Walter and Nmadili will share ideas join Dr. Marcia Arunga with a featured performance by Dadabass.

After being inspired by the work and ideas of visionaries Walter Hood and Nmadili Okumabua and memories of the CD as told by Dr. Marcia Tate Arunga on Friday at the Design Town Hall, Saturday we will take to bringing our own ideas to life with an all day Design Cipher workshop.

Four sites in the Central District including Black community landmarks Seattle Vocational Institute and Bryant Manor will be reimagined as a local “Black Wall Street” or “Wakanda”, but these places could be anywhere we are: Renton, Kent, Federal Way, Leimert Park in LA, Harlem, Southside Chicago or Third Ward in Houston!

Let’s imagine and design thriving Black neighborhoods of the future. Places where our well being is the focus, our legacies are honored, our spirits are nourished, our genius is cultivated and our collective futures are bright!”

About Walter Hood

Walter Hood is the Creative Director and Founder of Hood Design Studio in Oakland, California. Hood Design Studio is his tripartite practice, working across art + fabrication, design + landscape, and research + urbanism. He is also a professor of landscape architecture at the University of California, Berkeley and lectures on professional and theoretical projects nationally and internationally. Walter designs and creates urban spaces and objects that are public sculpture. Believing everyone needs beauty in their life, he makes use of everyday objects to create new apertures through which to see the surrounding emergent beauty, strangeness, and idiosyncrasies of urban space. http://www.hooddesignstudio.com/

About Nmadili Okwumabua

Nmadili Okwumabua is an Atlanta based architect and CEO of Southern Sahara, a design consultancy specializing in the research and development of modern African architecture. Nmadili is also the founder of Founder of the Community Planning & Design Initiative Africa and a professor of African Architecture & Urban Design at Kennesaw State University in Atlanta, Georgia. https://www.cpdiafrica.org/the-founder/

Central District Design Weekend

Design Town Hall, July 13th, 5-8pm, Garfield High School

Design Cipher, July 14th, 10am-5pm, Garfield High School

Community Dinner, 14th, 5-9pm, 23rd & Union

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend

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You are receiving this email because you have attended or expressed interest in an Africatown event.

Our mailing address is:
Africatown Seattle
PO Box 22328
Seattle, WA 98122

23rd and Union development update: Notes on Africatown Plaza

As developers snag every available piece of land in the booming real estate market of Central Seattle, African American community members demand a seat at the table when it comes to who fills the future Africatown portion of Midtown development at 23rd and Union. How do you address the concerns of a diverse community while understanding the history of the land the development is being built on? By meeting, bringing those voices together, and giving them a chance to express their concerns and desires for positive change.

Read more Full Report

Here’s how Seattle became so segregated

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A new look at New Deal ‘redlining’ maps offers insight into subtle racism’s not-so-subtle predecessor

The “redlining” maps minted during the New Deal were a roadmap for investment in America’s cities. Seattle was no exception in warning bankers off extending loans to home buyers in non-white neighborhoods. Here’s a look some of the more racist descriptions offered about Seattle’s neighborhoods back in 1936. They’re rated “A” to “D,” with “A” being best.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

!*PLEASE READ AND SUPPORT! African-American Heritage Museum UPDATE #3

!*PLEASE READ AND SUPPORT! African-American Heritage Museum UPDATE #3

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POWER TO THE PEOPLE!
=======================
)From: “Black Autonomy”
)Subject: African-American Heritage Museum and Cultural Center UPDATE #3
) (1998):
)Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 14:18:35 PST

Marpessa Kupendua

African-American Heritage Museum and Cultural Center UPDATE #3 (1998):
“The Youth Action Committee Takes Control Of The Last Black Institution
In Seattle!”

As predicted, last night’s meeting at SVI was indeed turbulent. The
uncle toms brought in 3 uniformed Seattle Police officers, along with
East Precinct Lt. Harry Bailey (local “Weed and Seed director and 32nd
degree freemason).

So far, all the communiques I’ve sent out have been very long (and I
apologize to those who weren’t trying to read all of that), but I felt
it was important in order for those who weren’t there, particularly
those outside of Seattle, to have a clear picture of what’s going on;
thus all the details. I’ll try to be brief with this one and anyone have
questions please feel free to email me, write, or call the museum at
206-320-9321 for more info. Again, let me also offer everyone the
opportunity to review the relevant documents for themselves, send us $2
for postage and we’ll send you copies of everything we have.

To begin with, none of the grassroots concerns were on the agenda that
Bob and Co. prepared. In addition, the committee reports were fabricated
due to the fact that the only committees for the museum that have been
meeting regularly at the museum offices are the Youth Action Committee
and African International Affairs Committee. Omari Tahir, founder of the
museum/cultural center started the meeting with the complete history up
to the illegal activities of Bob Flowers, Bob Luciano, Pat Chandler, and
Harolynn Bobis (and others). He cited the relevant Revised Codes of
Washington and told the crowd of 100 or so what else the ‘toms have been
doing.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

Nickelsville campers relocate to UMOJA Center property in the CD

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Nickelsville campers relocate to UMOJA Center property in the CD
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2016 – 1:29 pm by Bryan Cohen

The fallout from last week’s eviction of the Nickelsville camp near the intersection of Seattle’s two interstates has reached the Central District. Around 20 former Nickelsville campers have temporarily relocated to the UMOJA P.E.A.C.E Center property at 23rd and E Spring. A dozen sleeping tents and a kitchen tent went up on the property earlier this week.

The now displaced residents of the sanctioned tent and tiny house encampment on Dearborn Ave. were evicted by property owners Coho Real Estate after the campers voted to disassociate from the Nickelsville organization and run the camp themselves, citing unfair treatment by the Nickelsville leadership. Coho had partnered with the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd to sponsor the site and lawfully host it on its property.

READ MORE FULL ARTICLE

Creating Africatown In Seattle’s Central District

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Bill Radke speaks with Wyking Garrett about his vision to create an Africatown — akin to a Chinatown or International District — in Seattle. Garrett sees Africatown as a way to expand and preserve the African-American identity of Seattle’s Central District.

LISTEN TO AFRICATOWN COMMUNITY LEADER WYKING GARRETT